From the kitchen

September 20, 2016 by Robbie Stowe

The Bloody Mary’s origin is unclear, and there are multiple conflicting claims of who invented the Bloody Mary.

Fernand Petiot claimed to have invented the Bloody Mary in 1921, well before any of the later claims. He was working at the New York Bar in Paris at the time, which later became Harry’s New York Bar, a frequent Paris hangout for Ernest Hemingway and other American expatriates. Harry’s Bar also claims to have created numerous other classic cocktails, including the White Lady and the Side Car.

James Rollins writes in the “What’s True, What’s Not” section of his Sigma Force novel The Skeleton Key (2010) that the Bloody Mary was invented in the Hemingway Bar at The Ritz Paris.

New York’s 21 Club has two claims associated with it. One is that it was invented in the 1930s by a bartender named Henry Zbikiewicz, who was charged with mixing Bloody Marys. Another attributes its invention to the comedian George Jessel, who frequented the 21 Club. In 1939, Lucius Beebe printed in his gossip column This New York one of the earliest U.S. references to this drink, along with the original recipe: “George Jessel’s newest pick-me-up which is receiving attention from the town’s paragraphers is called a Bloody Mary: half tomato juice, half vodka”

This is a Bloody Mary with a twist

From the kitchen by Kingking Tabtong of THAILAND

Ingredients

  • 50 ml bay leaf infused Ketel one Vodka
  • 60 ml Tomato puree
  • 2 bar spoon of salsa
  • Tabasco Sauce
  • Worcestershire sauces
  • Sea salt
  • Black peppers

Method

Add ingredients into a working glass

Stir

Strain into cup

Garnish

Glassware

Cooper pot or Juliep

Garnish

Celery
Red beans paste
Olive
Bell peppers
Cream cheese
Cherry tomato
Smoked salt

Comments

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POST BY Robbie Stowe
Drink slinging, Fire breathing, Flair master and full time Booze Fanatic.
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